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Book one of these fabulous church venues in London for an alternative and unique edge to your event, and guarantee an incredible atmosphere and charm too.... Church - Venue Hire London | Canvas Events Church - Venue Hire London | Canvas Events
 

Church Venues in London

Churches may well be an obvious venue choice when it comes to weddings, but it’s truly a shame how often they are overlooked for other occasions as well. With guaranteed charm and atmosphere, and often a rich historical and cultural heritage ingrained within their very walls, London’s churches have so much potential to offer as a unique and impressive setting for many different occasions, including exhibitions, conferences, meetings and receptions. We even have blank canvas crypt spaces that grant you full creative freedom within our portfolio, so take a look and see what hidden gems you can uncover.

Featured in well connected, much sought-after areas of the city and able to accommodate a vast range of different budgets and capacities, we are confident that we have the church venue that is right for you.

  • Camden

    The Glasshouse on the Lock

    Standing 350
    Theatre 120
    Dining 200
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  • Victoria Station

    Footstool

    Standing 180
    Dining 150
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  • Paddington

    Porchester Hall

    Standing 600
    Theatre 450
    Dining 450
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  • Camberwell

    The Lighthouse

    Standing 2850
    Theatre 1800
    Cabaret 500
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  • Bankside

    Garden Museum London

    Standing 300
    Theatre 120
    Dining 130
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  • Farringdon

    The Crypt

    Standing 300
    Theatre 200
    Dining 150
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  • Peckham

    Asylum Chapel

    Standing 150
    Theatre 120
    Cabaret 80
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  • Tower Hill

    Vout-O-Reenee's

    Standing 150
    Theatre 70
    Dining 30
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  • Fitzrovia

    One Marylebone

    Standing 800
    Theatre 500
    Dining 350
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  • Wood Green

    Dominion Centre

    Standing 600
    Theatre 2000
    Dining 200
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  • Piccadilly

    St James Piccadilly

    Standing 150
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  • Westminster

    Central Hall Westminster

    Standing 4500
    Theatre 2039
    Cabaret 420
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Make Your Book Launch Special

?If you are a publisher tasked with marketing a book, or a self-published author looking to promote your new work, you’ll understand just how vital a book launch is. Getting the crowds there and buying the book, be it fiction, non-fiction, or poetry, is a vital start in getting the sales needed to be successful. To make your book launch truly special, you need to make it as enticing as possible.


Venue


The first way to do this is through the venue that you choose to hold it in. While libraries and book shops are the obvious choices – and do work well – finding a unique venue that is a little bit out of the ordinary can intrigue your potential audience so much that they make a point of attending your launch. After all, if you regularly go to book launches, it becomes easier to skip the odd one unless it really grips you. This is particularly true for any press you are hoping will be in attendance. Hosing your book launch in a café, bar, or even one of the church venues for hire in London, can give your event an added gravitas. An interesting venue hints at an interesting book.


Coordinate


If you are traditionally published but organising your own launch, it’s important to ask your publisher about the help that they offer authors. They may give you some marketing materials and other goodies to hand out, as well as advertising the launch through their channels. If you are self-publishing, then get in contact with your local arts centre to see if you could collaborate. Maybe there is another author looking to launch a book at the same time as you. If so, you could join up for the event. This will not only mean splitting costs, but you are much more likely to gain a larger audience – who might buy two books instead of one! Coordinating with as many people as possible is always advised. The arts community generally wants to promote each other and is always willing to help a new author.


Who to Invite?


The more people you can get attending your launch, the better. Encourage friends and family to come along and support you, as well as those from your writing group if you have one. You can even print flyers and put them in your local cafes and arts centres. Getting the press involved is always a good idea. Have press kits made up and don’t be shy about getting interviews arranged. You can also invite book bloggers and reviewers to the launch to encourage them to write about the book and generate even more publicity.


Have a Bookseller


Make sure that you are in contact with a reliable local bookseller from the very beginning. You need to make sure that they can source the book, or that you can get all of the copies directly from the publisher. The book selling needs to be able to look after itself on the night as there will be times when it will be quite busy. You, whether you’re the author or the publicist, are going to have your hands full with the rest of the event, so you need to be confident that all of the sales will be going smoothly.


Publicise


Getting the word out there is the key to any successful book launch. After all, no one can come if they don’t know that it’s happening. Social media is very important for writers now, and the author needs to use this to his or her full advantage. Making a Facebook event, promoting it, taking pictures when the cover is revealed. Anything and everything they can to promote their new work. Bloggers have already been mentioned. Many would be happy if an author wanted to go on what’s known as a ‘blog tour’, answering questions about their book and writing process or even their favourite authors. Whatever the blogger wanted in exchange for some promotion for their new book. Don’t forget about the importance of the phone call or even the text message. If an author reaches out in person to ask people to attend, then they’re much more likely to get a positive response.


Think About Your Audience


Some refreshments are expected, make sure that you have someone taking care of this. It usually includes wine or soft drinks – there’s no real need to offer anything more. Just something for the audience to sip while they chat and mingle with others. When the author gives a reading, it shouldn’t be too long. There should also be no long winded explanation about how they found themselves writing the book. Brief is best, give the audience a taste, but don’t bore them. After that’s done, the author needs to be prepared to sign copies of the book and talk to the people who have so kindly turned up to the launch. Time needs to be spent showing how much you appreciate the turnout. Too many authors spend the time talking only to their friends – it’s important to mingle with the people that you don’t know but who obviously have an interest in the book. At the same time, it’s important that you enjoy yourself. This is your night after all and it’s time to take the time to revel in its success. This is true whether you are the author – or just the organiser.


Launching a book is an exciting time for any author. Whether it’s your first book or your fifth, the launch is just as important to get right every time. By choosing a truly unique venue and advertising the event well in advance and to as many people as possible, you are sure to have a launch night to remember.